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I Can’t Believe He Shot A Rabbit!

>21 February 2009
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His First RabbitI cannot believe he actually did it! He shot a rabbit!

As my husband came in from working outside this evening he said to me, “You wanna try some rabbit meat?” I said, “Uhhh (hesitating), Why? Do you have some?” I thought maybe somebody had given him some to try. He said, “No. But there are two rabbits out in the yard right now, and I’m about to shoot one.” I was like Yeah, right. Thinking he was joking I said, “Well, if you shoot it, you’re eating it!”

He went into the bedroom and came out with my shotgun. I said, “You’re gonna shoot it with that? You’re going to blow it’s head off!” He just said, “Nah,” as he stepped outside. Whatever! I went about my mommy business. A few minutes later he was inside again, sitting in the living room reading his survival guide book.

From another room I could hear him gasping in horror. I called, “What?” wondering what was so grotesque, figuring he was reading about how to skin a rabbit. He said, “It says to cut the fur at the belly, being careful not to puncture it’s stomach, and then using my thumbs pull the skin off…” then I heard him say something about twisting the rabbits head off.

Gross!!!

Laughing at his horror, when just a minute ago he was all about skinning his first rabbit, I said, “See, if you shoot a rabbit, you’re gonna have to skin it. You’re not killing it for nothing, you have to eat it!” He said, “I already shot one.” No way. I quickly accused him of lying. I totally did not believe him. But he insisted that it was laying out in the yard. Oh my goodness!

My husband went on to say, “I think I can just put it in boiling water and the skin will come off.” To which I immediately replied, “You are NOT putting a hairy rabbit in my pot!” Then I laughed at his idea and added, “Jerry, it’s not like putting a chicken in boiling water to pluck it’s feathers, the skin won’t just peal off! You’re supposed to put it in boiling water after you skin it!” He was sure he could just boil it.

It really was quite a humorous scene. Two city kids, trying to figure out how to skin and cook a rabbit. As he went back outside I joked, ” Have fun popping it’s head off!” After a minute, I peeked out the back window to see what he was doing. I laughed aloud as I watched him. He was aimlessly wandering the backyard, holding the dead rabbit by it’s hind legs. I stuck my head out the door, and when he saw me he looked lost as he said, “I’m supposed to hang it up somewhere so I can skin it.” There was nowhere to hang it.

I laughed again and said, “That’s why you’re supposed to read the directions before jumping into a project!” (Something I tease him about not doing all the time!) Then all of a sudden he jumped and yelled out, “Fleas! It’s got fleas!!” and he quickly dropped the rabbit and hopped back, brushing his sleeve and shirt off.

What a crack up!! This was too funny.

He came back inside, and decided to call a friend of ours who hunts. “Steve… how do you skin a rabbit? I just shot one in my backyard.” Steve was kind enough to offer help. So, my husband put the flea ridden varmint in a trash bag, and drove up the road to our friend’s house so he could show poor Jerry what to do.

A little while later, Jerry came home with a ziploc bag of rabbit meat. Steve did all of the work, Jerry just watched and learned. Lucky for Jerry (he later admitted to me that he didn’t think he could gut one himself). He asked me if I was going to eat any of it. I said, “No way! It might have some disease or something.” He teased me, “You’ll never make it if we ever have to live off the land.” To which I replied, “We have food in the fridge right now. If I was starving, I’d eat a rabbit. But I’m not starving!” I looked at it in the bag, still a whole body, just without fur, feet or a head. Gross. It still looked like a rabbit. And I could see all of the tiny holes in it’s flesh from the shotgun shell. He told me that the shell pieces would come out while soaking, and if not, we could just spit them out if we bite into any. No thank you!

Jerry explained to me that Steve told him to soak the rabbit in salt water overnight to get the blood to drain out. Then tomorrow he will boil it to kill any bacteria, and fry it up like chicken. It’s supposed to be the best tasting meat… so we’ve heard. I’ll let Jerry do the testing though! If he doesn’t die from eating it, I might try the next one.

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8 Comments »

  • Lynn said:

    Great story. We actually raised rabbits when I was growing up for the meat. It really is quite good but I agree the killing, skinning and such is a pain to deal with. I am not so sure I would want to eat a wild rabbit now though.

  • Amy Ellen said:

    This is hilarious. I can hear this very conversation going on in our home… except that I don’t own my own shotgun… but the rest could really be us!

  • LuAnn said:

    That is too funny! I’m with you. There is a reason I don’t live in the country. Please let us know how your husband liked eating the rabbit.

  • Michelle said:

    I raise rabbits, and they’re delicious! Soaking in salt water overnight is definitely the thing to do. I boil my rabbits, pick the meat off the bones (then feed the bones to the dogs) and cook it up in a casserole so it goes further. My children LOVE it! Be brave – it’s great :) Tastes a bit like chicken, but richer. And it’s VERY lean!

  • Rachel said:

    Oh, Rabbit is absolutely delicious! I grew up eating it. However, we raised the rabbits ourselves.

  • LisaAlso said:

    Wow! You’ll have to let us know how you cooked it and how it tasted! I have an over-abundance of rabbits cavorting in my yard, and if I don’t get them under control, they will no doubt eat my veggies once I plant them!

  • Teresa said:

    LOL!! I have to share my story because it’s a lot like yours. My husband got a rabbit – with a sling shot, of all things too! – a few years back. I’d always told him that if he got one, I’d field dress it. We have a book on how to field-dress small game, but I had never done it before. Anyway, I had hubby hold the book out in front of me while I was tackling this rabbit (lots of “turn the page”, “no, wait, turn it back to the previous page for a second…” etc.) Incidentally, we’re both city kids too…although we now process our own chickens. :)

    Hubby made rabbit cacciatore from the beast and it was darn tasty (except for the fact that I didn’t take out the scent gland under the armpits…the book never mentioned that!! but my FIL said, after the fact, that you should if you don’t like musky rabbit. Live and learn).

    These days, we have a farm dog who hunts and eats the rabbits so we don’t get a chance to get one before she does. :)

    Loved your story…thanks for bringing back memories for me!

  • Andrew said:

    Wow, i must be the only falconer who reads your blogs. Rabbit meat is one of the healthiest and leanest meats you can eat. Falconers who fly hawks such as red-tails and harris hawks are very fond of this wonderful meat.

    I’ll include some information below that would be helpful for anyone who’d like to try rabbit meat

    First is to make a suggestion to your readers to NOT soak the meat in water (salt or otherwise) as you lose much of the nutrition this way. Falconers who want to bring the weight of their hawk down (and still reward them) will soak meat in water overnight and in some cases the nutritional value (calories) of the food can be reduced by 90%. That might sound incredible but I’ve seen it myself. If i cut up meat of any kind and soak it well in smaller pieces for 24 hours and feed it to my red-tailed hawk, it is nearly the same as not feeding her.

    The other thing I was going to mention is how easy it is to gut and clean a rabbit once you know what you are doing. After you have done it 5-10 times, you should be able to take a freshly killed rabbit and remove the guts and have it cleaned and in your fridge in under 15 minutes. First, gutting the rabbit should only take you 10 seconds or so – if you “squeeze gut” it – this is incredibly simple. Google squeeze gutting a rabbit if you want to know more. Now you have a gutted rabbit ready to clean. If you cut the head off first, then skinning it is quite fast – the skin pulls off very easily. The only parts of the rabbit worth the effort for human consumption is the backstraps and thighs. Cut these off first, briefly run them under cold water and remove and ‘stray’ hairs. You’re done. If you have a carnivorous pet, I’d suggest cutting the rest of the rabbit up into 3 or 4 sections for them. This way you do not waste any part of the rabbit.

    For those that do not prefer the “gamey” taste of a wild rabbit, take your rabbit meat and marinade it for a few days (I prefer 7 days and cut the meat into cubes to soak – feel free to email me for some recipes) – done this way, it is very hard to taste any gameyness and most people wouldn’t know it from chicken.

    One last suggestion – if you’d prefer to not find shotgun pellets in your rabbit meat, try hunting with a raptor instead :)

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