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How To Make Rose Hip Tea For Vitamin C

>12 February 2014
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One of my goals this year is to plant a bunch of Rosa Rugosa Roses so that I can not only enjoy their beauty and fragrance, but also their large rose hips once the blooms have been spent.

Rose hips are the large orange-ish bulbs that develop where a rose bud has bloomed and died. Certain varieties of roses grow bigger, tastier hips than others. “Rosa Rugosa” is one of the best, although there are other varieties which grow nice hips as well. The hips are edible. You can eat them fresh, or you can dry them and make a delicious tea. Rose hips are packed with even more Vitamin C than citrus fruits.

During the cold and flu season, I used to give my family Vitamin C tablets to help boost their immune systems. But what exactly are the ingredients in those store-bought pills? Sometimes there are additives in there that I’d rather not give my loved ones. Recently I have begun making rose hip tea instead. Rose hips are a completely natural and potent source of Vitamin C. And the tea is delicious.

I make mine pretty simple.

rosehips
This is what dried rose hips look like. I order Organic Cut Rose Hips from The Bulk Herb Store {affiliate link}. One day I hope to grow them myself.

rosehip tea infuser
I like to use a teapot with an infuser to make my tea. Get a pot of water boiling, pour it over the rose hips in the infuser, place the lid over the pot and allow to steep for 5-10 min. If you don’t have a teapot like this, you can toss the rose hips into a pot of simmering water, remove from heat, and allow to steep that way as well. You’ll just want to strain off the tea as you serve it.

I use about 1 Tbsp rose hips per cup of hot water. There’s no exact science behind it, I’ve just found this strength to suit us best. Feel free to adjust to your liking.

Rosehip tea
Sweeten with honey. My kids particularly enjoy sipping the tea through Organic Cinnamon Sticks (also from The Bulk Herb Store). It makes me happy to watch them all contentedly slurping down their immune boosting tea.

Rose hips make a great addition to other herbal teas. I also use them in an elderberry cough syrup I make for the kids.

Do you have a favorite Rose Hip Tea recipe to share?

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6 Comments »

  • Jen said:

    I have organic rose hips and cinnamon sticks. I’m going to make this for my boys. I think they’ll love it! Thanks for the great idea.

  • Kendra at New Life On A Homestead (author) said:

    I hope they enjoy it, Jen! :)

  • tealady3 said:

    How ironic,just yesterday I was thinking about growing some roses for making rose hip tea.Well here in Wisconsin we have snow,snow and more snow my growing season isn’t real long so I will be checking out the Bulk Herb store.Thank-you for the tips.

    I enjoy your blog so much.

  • Debbi said:

    I wonder if I could grind them up in my mortar and pestle and make my own vitamin c capsules…hmmmm…

  • Kendra at New Life On A Homestead (author) said:

    Yes, Debbi! You absolutely can :)

  • Jessica T said:

    I’ll have to try this tomorrow! I also keep rose hips around for elderberry syrup. I need a teapot like that!

    I really love this post because it also answered two questions I’ve had, but never took the time to “google” before: “What are those orange-ish bulbs on the rose bushes?”, and “Where do rose hips come from?” So thank you! :)

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